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"What trait in a character would you truly consider heroic and does that cause you to respect them?", 4 days ago, 8:19 PM #1
mightguy15

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So it's probably no secret I am a huge fan of heroes. I think letting people know about the importance of never giving up, becoming stronger both mentally and physically and always stretching to reach your full potential is a powerful and important one that I admire and respect characters like All Might and Superman for.


But occasionally I do fall upon the character that shines light on the hopelessness of some aspects of society. Grim aspects such as murder and crime cause me to find myself sympathizing with people like Light Yagami and Guts from Berserk.

And obviously there are huge gaps in ideals between All Might/superman and Light/Guts, with the former stretching ideals of morality to their maximum limits and the others going so far as to justify murder and killing villians.


Frankly for myself, the line between hero and villain between these characters is quite blurry (and Berserk readers know full well why Guts' actions can be understandable most likely, lol).



So I'm just curious, what aspects in a character would you consider heroic and would that cause you to respect them? Do you value selflessness and the strong protecting the weak? Do you think that's cheesy, and that true heroes should empower the weak rather than catering to their ills?

Fan of anti-heroes? If so, what do you respect about them?
4 days ago, 8:44 PM #2
Kokoneos

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This, imo, is the definition of a hero--v




Do what's right against all odds without hope, without witness, and without reward.
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4 days ago, 8:46 PM #3
ShaRose49

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mightguy15:So it's probably no secret I am a huge fan of heroes. I think letting people know about the importance of never giving up, becoming stronger both mentally and physically and always stretching to reach your full potential is a powerful and important one that I admire and respect characters like All Might and Superman for.


But occasionally I do fall upon the character that shines light on the hopelessness of some aspects of society. Grim aspects such as murder and crime cause me to find myself sympathizing with people like Light Yagami and Guts from Berserk.

And obviously there are huge gaps in ideals between All Might/superman and Light/Guts, with the former stretching ideals of morality to their maximum limits and the others going so far as to justify murder and killing villians.


Frankly for myself, the line between hero and villain between these characters is quite blurry (and Berserk readers know full well why Guts' actions can be understandable most likely, lol).



So I'm just curious, what aspects in a character would you consider heroic and would that cause you to respect them? Do you value selflessness and the strong protecting the weak? Do you think that's cheesy, and that true heroes should empower the weak rather than catering to their ills?

Fan of anti-heroes? If so, what do you respect about them?


I enjoy all kinds of characters, but to me, a heroic trait I find that I admire and respect a lot is showing mercy to someone even if they don’t feel like it or that person has done some bad things. (Now I’m not saying that they should just let the bad guys go or anything). My favourite heroes also believe fiercely in their own ideals/beliefs, so much so that they are even willing to risk their own lives for them. This kind of attitude inspires others or at least, earns the respect of some of the other characters, even if many will still consider them foolish and naive.

(Edit) there are lots of other ways a character can be considered a hero, but these are just some ways that I particularly admire.
4 days ago, 8:46 PM #4
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I'm a sucker for those old fashioned "self-sacrificing" heroes. Like a hero who will risk their life searching a treacherous cavern to find a child that went missing. In a world of strife and heartache, where it's all too tempting to only look out for yourself, it's the selfless and determined optimists I admire.
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4 days ago, 8:59 PM #5
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well, it's probably no secret either that my preferences are as Silver Age-y as can be. I always saw classic heroes as those wonderful, larger-than-life, awe-inspiring figures. they're selfless, altruistic, they never give up, and bonus points if they also have fun or make me laugh. lightheartedness still exists, c'mon.

this model got plenty of opposite archetypes over the years, and that's cool. I like the occasional contrasting character, and it'd be boring if everyone were clones. what I don't like is when it comes at the expense of "true" heroes, or when a writer who's obviously a bad boy at heart thinks edgy antiheroes should be the norm. see also: 90s comics, and while the over-the-top stuff faded away, you can still see a lot of the "classic heroes are outdated goody-two-shoes" attitude nowadays. *

realism is also a factor. franchises that try too hard to be realistic, like modern superhero comics, end up making classic heroes look "silly" or "cheesy" due to the inevitable tonal dissonance. this is why I threw realism outta the window in my works, so I can write whatever I want without worrying about it. your choice of setting influences how (un)heroic your protagonists are by default.


* don't get me wrong, I actually like many characters that were, briefly became, still are, or outright started as antiheroes. what I can't stand is when they/the writers think they're so much better than more heroic heroes.


bonus: meet Quasar, one of Marvel's greatest heroes! he, among other things, became the first human Protector of the Universe, went down a lava pit to defeat an animated alien armor, spent three years traveling to Uranus without a spaceship, died to protect the Earth and came back to stop the kinetic death of the universe (long story), defeated an entity who retcons superheroes out of existence, dared to defy Infinity Gauntlet!Thanos (only in the comics), and still makes me laugh.
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4 days ago, 9:35 PM #6
Kevtrev

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One thing that often boosts my respect for heroes is when they push beyond a boundary that everyone simply assumed was impossible to breach (as long as it's believable and breaking said boundary results in some kind of emotional payoff).

Example from Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood:


This kind of thing usually happens when everyone around the hero says they can't do something, or something is simply not physically possible, but then the hero does it anyway.
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4 days ago, 10:12 PM #7
Sol Kage

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For me, it's probably the ability to never give up, no matter how bleak things may seem.
4 days ago, 10:13 PM #8
CrosEL

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mightguy15:



So I'm just curious, what aspects in a character would you consider heroic and would that cause you to respect them? Do you value selflessness and the strong protecting the weak? Do you think that's cheesy, and that true heroes should empower the weak rather than catering to their ills?

Fan of anti-heroes? If so, what do you respect about them?


My initial and still ongoing view of what a hero should be, is someone able to do what's needed.
Similarly to Kokoneos' example; I loved when someone was able to sacrifice a lot to help others..
This includes Anti-heroic actions--killing actual villains.. Before I was aware of manga/anime,
most comic heroes seemed to only get villains arrested and allowed for more people to suffer
at said villains' hands, ..which felt wrong. (Which is why videogame heroes were more enjoyable--Link
tries to murder Ganon, the man literally needs to resurrect to continue his plans, showing our hero's
doing everything to stop the monster. Also, am now only recently aware that some comic heroes maybe kill?)
When I started writing, I included both a "anti-hero" and a hero to let any future-readers decide
on what they truly thought was right.. The direct effects of the decisions they made were quick
and violent and one could truly see what was "right"...


On the other hand; I can enjoy truly pure heroes, and am doing a story about one.. Ones who're humble/know full well the ramifications of their actions and can genuinely care for the people they save and have let die, is something I can support. The thing I'm doing shows moreso what's going through the guy's head when he starts a action, and his considering what'll happen before and during his saves, again, a neutral POV is shown; where we see other heroes going over the same thing, while the main character is the only one who wonders if he's truly doing the right thing... …(Just realized I went off track...)Long-story-short, I can understand anti-heroes more, and would consider anything else solely made for show..
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4 days ago, 10:50 PM #9
mightguy15

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ShaRose49:I enjoy all kinds of characters, but to me, a heroic trait I find that I admire and respect a lot is showing mercy to someone even if they don’t feel like it or that person has done some bad things. (Now I’m not saying that they should just let the bad guys go or anything). My favourite heroes also believe fiercely in their own ideals/beliefs, so much so that they are even willing to risk their own lives for them. This kind of attitude inspires others or at least, earns the respect of some of the other characters, even if many will still consider them foolish and naive.

(Edit) there are lots of other ways a character can be considered a hero, but these are just some ways that I particularly admire.


Ahh, I agree completely. Should it also be a must to have that guy there? As in the guy whose like "Superman, that's stupid. You're stupid for doing this..." When he does something like let a villain go?


I think that would make a cool dynamic, having the person there with the face value moral structure putting down the guy that's trying to be uber heroic and morally upstanding. Maybe that's too much and the character can hold weight on their own?

Merged Doublepost:

Kokoneos:This, imo, is the definition of a hero--v

Video


Do what's right against all odds without hope, without witness, and without reward.


Damn,that hit me in the feels like a truck.

Merged Doublepost:

Matt Comics:well, it's probably no secret either that my preferences are as Silver Age-y as can be. I always saw classic heroes as those wonderful, larger-than-life, awe-inspiring figures. they're selfless, altruistic, they never give up, and bonus points if they also have fun or make me laugh. lightheartedness still exists, c'mon.

this model got plenty of opposite archetypes over the years, and that's cool. I like the occasional contrasting character, and it'd be boring if everyone were clones. what I don't like is when it comes at the expense of "true" heroes, or when a writer who's obviously a bad boy at heart thinks edgy antiheroes should be the norm. see also: 90s comics, and while the over-the-top stuff faded away, you can still see a lot of the "classic heroes are outdated goody-two-shoes" attitude nowadays. *

realism is also a factor. franchises that try too hard to be realistic, like modern superhero comics, end up making classic heroes look "silly" or "cheesy" due to the inevitable tonal dissonance. this is why I threw realism outta the window in my works, so I can write whatever I want without worrying about it. your choice of setting influences how (un)heroic your protagonists are by default.


* don't get me wrong, I actually like many characters that were, briefly became, still are, or outright started as antiheroes. what I can't stand is when they/the writers think they're so much better than more heroic heroes.


bonus: meet Quasar, one of Marvel's greatest heroes! he, among other things, became the first human Protector of the Universe, went down a lava pit to defeat an animated alien armor, spent three years traveling to Uranus without a spaceship, died to protect the Earth and came back to stop the kinetic death of the universe (long story), defeated an entity who retcons superheroes out of existence, dared to defy Infinity Gauntlet!Thanos (only in the comics), and still makes me laugh.
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Ahh, that makes sense. Feeling real and being realistic are two different things, seems a lot of writers really focus on the latter. Their motivations definitely need to be realistic at least, and not seem ridiculous, though it's really all about the fun sometimes, lol.


Also, jesus Christ, Quasar is insanely dedicated.
3 days ago, 2:28 AM #10
ShaRose49

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Ahh, I agree completely. Should it also be a must to have that guy there? As in the guy whose like "Superman, that's stupid. You're stupid for doing this..." When he does something like let a villain go?


I think that would make a cool dynamic, having the person there with the face value moral structure putting down the guy that's trying to be uber heroic and morally upstanding. Maybe that's too much and the character can hold weight on their own?


I don’t know if there always has to be a naysayer in the picture, sometimes something really subtle is more moving, but yeah, I could see that being an interesting dynamic in many cases, where the hero does what they believe is right even when their friends say “Don’t!” An example of this is Sonic vs Shadow in the current run of the comics. When Eggman loses his memory and becomes a completely different person who is kind and gentle, Sonic thinks that they should just forgive Eggman for everything he’s done in the past since he’s clearly no longer the same person, but Shadow thinks that it’s only fair that Eggman die for his deeds whether he understands what he’s done or not. The two characters battle each other until Sonic tells Shadow that if Eggman can’t be forgiven then he can’t either, since Shadow once tried to destroy the whole world as well.

An example of something much more subtle is in the original Ninja Turtles movie, when Splinter is a badly beaten prisoner of The Foot, hanging by chains and probably not being allowed to eat or drink much. And yet when a troubled young Foot Soldier comes near him in an attempt to be alone, Splinter sees the sad look in his eyes, and offers to be a listening ear to him. This may not seem like much, but if you consider all the physical agony (and emotional agony since he hasn’t seen his sons in weeks) that Splinter must be going through, it’s not only pretty darned impressive that he’d think of another person, (much less someone working for the enemy) it’s just plain beautiful.
3 days ago, 3:05 AM #11
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They can do heroin and beat up people without caring but ALSO have great hair.

Great hair is an important heroic quality.
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3 days ago, 3:09 AM #12
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Respect huh? The willingness to fight, maybe even kill, and die for their beliefs.

Rorschach is best boy.
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3 days ago, 3:34 AM #13
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Rorschach's beliefs were supposed to be abhorrent. The author wanted him to be a disgusting sociopath who was a negative reflection of a batman style hero who rigidly adheres to a crazy code.

Besides, for all his talk of living without compromise he worked along side those lesbians, despite decrying them.
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3 days ago, 3:37 AM #14
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Achieve your goals with success. Those people will always be awe-inspiring.
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3 days ago, 4:55 AM #15
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Unwavering, unselfish kindness and selflessness
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3 days ago, 5:15 AM #16
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The Letter M:Rorschach's beliefs were supposed to be abhorrent.

Yeah, he's a crazy weirdo. Moore's mistake was giving him the moral high ground with Veidt's master plan. In the end, he was the most heroic guy out of the rest who looked the other way.
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3 days ago, 5:39 AM #17
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That pretty much depends on the genre. It's safe to assume no one wants Superman in an Iron Age story where everything he does will be futile. By the same token, Wolverine's edgelordiness isn't likely to be welcome in a four-color story.

If you're looking for actually admirable qualities, don't go for "design by committee," just create a character you would find admirable.
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3 days ago, 3:24 PM #18
mightguy15

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I completely agree. I was just curious as what were the traits you guys admired and respected, it's fun seeing how different everyone is.
3 days ago, 3:39 PM #19
sicemera

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Determination and true grit to never give up no matter how hard it gets. To me, those are strong qualities of a hero.
3 days ago, 3:41 PM #20
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For me, it has always been a person who cares unconditionally, has a sense empathy and is always willing to fight their own fights. And not necessarily through violence. A lot could be said about the heroes who avoid war and fighting because (as Steven Universe displayed) diplomacy can bring the best solutions. I never heroes who had this fixation with "honour" to the point where they became egomaniacs and were willing to put the safety of innocents at risk. Missions are not tournaments after all, so in those situations, is it really less honourable to do what it takes to save the innocents?
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